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Natural Disasters

Bangalore Floods Aftermath

Floods and other such occurrences are sometimes used to justify the notion of how nature can be unforgiving, humanity for better or worse often come up with new techniques which help in limiting the impact that these phenomena can cause. While The Dutch came up with The Delta Works half a century ago, The Japanese have invested a fortune in order to reach a stage where they can successfully forecast Earthquakes and thus enforce damage limitation. 

Bangalore Floods Aftermath

Floods and other such occurrences are sometimes used to justify the notion of how nature can be unforgiving, but humanity, for better or worse, often comes up with new techniques that help limit the impact that these phenomena can cause. While the Dutch came up with The Delta Works half a century ago, the Japanese have invested a fortune in order to reach a stage where they can successfully forecast earthquakes and thus enforce damage limitation.

But,

What’s next? Or, more importantly, what’s going on now?

 

Let’s take a more microscopic view of the sub-continent for a while, which after all is what we call home. Bengaluru, the 27th largest city in the world, is a major Feather in India’s cap. Globally, that’s as famous for its historical significance as it is for the development of the IT sector in India, and famously dubbed “THE INDIAN SILICON VALLEY,” witnessed a substantial amount of rainfall this monsoon, and while the rainfall received wasn’t exactly unprecedented, it still brought this glorious city to an unceremonious standstill.

 

Monsoon in India is somewhat like petting a cat; you never know how the encounter will end, so floods in themselves might not come as a massive shock to some, but the disruption they caused to the IT city should act as an ample warning about how, if preventive measures aren’t adopted soon enough, chances are one day things might go too far, which some might say is already happening as in the past couple of decades Karnataka has been responsible for 7-8% Flood-Related casualties in India.

Impact on Private Players

The floods affected all sections of society and, in doing so, caused a downward curve in the economic graph of the city. Although the effect was felt by one and all, from government employees to private sector players and from small business owners to MNC executives, I’m sure you must’ve come across clips doing the rounds on social media showing villas and posh cars submerged in water ( sorry boss ), but it was the corporate sector that faced the biggest shock.

A couple of years ago, the pandemic changed the way many corporations went about their business; “work from home” entered the common lingo, but eventually things started appearing to be going in a streamlined manner, until, pun intended, floods hit. While the floods rendered a major portion of the workforce unable to attend office, electricity outages limited their ability to work from home.

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The biggest cause of concern was the complete shutdown of transport services throughout the city; roads, railway tracks,  and runways all resembled water bodies, and the only way one could travel around was if they had the foresight to buy jet skis and motorboats and have them parked in their garages. Corporations throughout the city reported logistical issues as transportation of equipment became impossible due to the tumultuous rains, thereby causing the formation of a major bottleneck in the supply chain. The otherwise flourishing IT sector reported losses worth Rs 225 Cr. in a single day.

 

The real estate sector also suffered as a result of the floods, as the visuals of buildings getting flooded and basements becoming drenched made it to the national headlines and hence generated scepticism in interested buyers.

Conclusion

While we can choose to witness prominent politicians in the state exchange verbal blows, blaming each other for the existence of a poorly managed sewage and rainwater treatment network, the main question that begs to be answered is what options do the corporations and the citizens have? Networks can’t be laid down overnight; they need thorough planning and public support, and this might be the most difficult step for the Indian bureaucracy: the will to see the plan through to the finish line.

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